The Sea Wolf (Classic Reviews) (A Tad Spoiler-y)

Monday, November 14, 2016

Hello, and happy November! (I know it's already 2 weeks into the month, sorry!) Today I'm reviewing The Sea Wolf by Jack London. It's a great story, and I'm glad to have had the pleasure of reading it. I highly recommend it for sea-lovers and bold readers, but more details down below! Here's some info before we begin. 


  • Age Recommended: 11 and up 
  • Page Count: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Dover Publications (December 23, 1999)

The novel begins when Humphrey Van Weyden is swept overboard into San Francisco Bay, and plucked from the sea by Larsen's seal-hunting vessel, the Ghost. This ship's evil captain, Wolf Larsen - The Sea-Wolf - is a murderous tyrant who uses his superhuman strength to torture and destroy, his brilliant mind to invent sick games, and his relentless will to control his mutinous crew. Pressed into service as a cabin boy by the ruthless captain, Van Weyden becomes an unwilling participant in a brutal shipboard drama. Larsen's increasingly violent abuse of the crew fuels a mounting tension that ultimately boils into mutiny, shipwreck, and a desperate confrontation. (Synopsis taken from Amazon) 


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My Thoughts: 

There are so many things I enjoyed from The Sea Wolf, so prepare yourself for some gushing and rambling!

First and foremost, we have Humphrey Van Weyden, a book critic (*points to self* HEY) thrown on a ship in the middle of the ocean and forced to survive the frontier, also known as the schooner owned by captain Wolf Larson. Hump goes through a lot of character development, and he really grows as a person! I like how London shows that the path to being great isn’t easy, and it calls for a lot of pain and hard work.

As for Wolf Larson, he's a very two sided character. He’s tough, and scary, and a tad-bit crazy--who am I kidding, he's nuts--but there's also a ‘soft’ side to him. He’s really into books and philosophy, which I thought was pretty cool. BUT LET ME JUST SAY THIS:

His philosophical talks were my favorite parts of the book.

Honestly. They're all really deep and insightful, and I enjoyed being able to read and see things from his point of view. 

Another thing I really liked about the philosophical parts is that while the book stereotypes men as these big guys who work with their hands, Wolf Larson (and Hump too!) reveal that 'real' men are also people who have intelligence and morals...

They have brains too! *le gasp*

But with that being said, I also love that there’s female empowerment. Maud, another character that we meet a little way into the story begins as dainty and fragile. But as she works more and more on the boat, and experiences some challenges of her own, she becomes strong, and stronger.

I think my only big problem with the book was the lack of action near the end. The beginning was fantastic, it was packed with action and punching and fighting and whatnot. As you get deeper into the story however, the action takes a backseat, and the story focuses more on relationship development (which was a-okay with me because I’m a nerd for cute romantic things ;p). But from a synopsis like above, you’d expect some more, I don’t know, *HI-YAH*, than you actually get.

But all in all, I am more than impressed with the writing and plot. :)

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My Rating: 



I really enjoyed it! For those of you looking for a sea-faring adventure with a dash of philosophy and romance, this one is for you!)

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Thanks for joining me with this review, and I hope you have a great week! 

 
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